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Chiara is a freelance harpist, alongside orchetsras and solo recitals, she plays extensively for all manners of events including corporate cocktail parties, award ceremonies, private parties, cruises and weddings.

Since 1990 I have had a lot of concerts as a solo harpist (with both classic and Irish harp) as well as with other musicians (duo with another harp and also with violin, flute, cello, piano, voice, ensembles), performing in Italy, United Kingdom, Germany, Poland, Switzerland, Ireland and Spain.

In London I have had the pleasure to play at many renowed venues such as Claridge`s Hotel, Dorchester Hotel,Park Lane Hotel, Grosvenor House Hotel, Kai Restaurant in Mayfair, London City Hall;

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chiara

Art&Music installation Art Gallery 291, Studio 28, Estorick Collection of Modern Italian Art;
The Lane Lounge Bar, Hooka Lounge Bar, Vibe Bar.

I have also performed with the group Sitar Fusion Project combining classical Indian beats with western contemporary sounds; performances in London area (Bengal Quay), Bricklane Festival.

classic harp
The harp is a stringed musical instrument that has a number of individual strings running at an angle to its soundboard; the strings are plucked with the fingers. Harps have been known since antiquity in Asia, Africa and Europe, dating back at least as early as 3500 BC. The instrument had great popularity in Europe during the Middle Ages and Renaissance, where it evolved into a wide range of variants with new technologies, and was disseminated to Europe's colonies, finding particular popularity in Latin America. Although some ancient members of the harp family died out in the Near East and South Asia, descendants of early harps are still played in Myanmar and parts of Africa, and other defunct variants in Europe and Asia have been utilized by musicians in the modern era.
irish harp
The Celtic harp is a square harp traditional to Ireland and Scotland. It is known as cláirseach in Irish and clàrsach in Scottish Gaelic. In Ireland and Scotland, it was a wire-strung instrument requiring great skill and long practice to play, and was associated with the Gaelic ruling class. It appears on Irish and British coins and coat of arms of the Republic of Ireland, the United Kingdom and Canada.